techniques and elements project

Art Quilts 14 & 15

These two quilts are the last of the project.

14) “445”

“445”
stones, sun printing, thread painting

Sunlight
Muslin
Cotton fabric
Felt batting
Golden Fluid Acrylic – ultramarine blue
Piece of foam sponge
Sea stones
Metallic thread – gold
Polyester thread – copper
Found objects – old keys, metal no.4

To create the sun printed quilt top, I spread the paint out on the muslin with the sponge, making sure the muslin was highly saturated. It was a nice sunny day so I put the fabric outside on the grass and placed the metal number and the keys on top. When it was fully dry I removed the objects and added the felt batting. I thread painted inside the little openings within the object’s shapes then hand stitched the stones onto the quilt. Added the cotton fabric backing.

Tip:  Metallic thread is iffy when machine stitching. I used a metallic needle and the thread still broke intermittently. Stitching slowly helps.

15) “puffy pear”

“puffy pear”
tie dye, transfer (digital), trapunto, trim

Muslin
Cotton fabric
Felt batting
Jaquard Textile Color – golden rod, olive green, sky blue
Rubber bands
Plastic container
Beaded trim
Polyester fiberfil batting
Polyester thread – copper
Transfer Artist’s Paper
Royalty free image – pear
Inkjet printer
Latex gloves

After randomly tying the rubber bands around the tightly squeezed muslin, I put the fabric in a plastic container and squeezed out paint on top of it, purposely leaving some white spaces. I squished it with gloved hands to work the paint in and left it to dry overnight. Somehow the green took over but the tie-dye effect was a success. The pear image was printed on Artist’s Transfer Paper, cut out and then ironed onto the quilt top. The fiberfil batting was put under the pear shape and I stitched an outline around it to create the trapunto effect. I then trimmed of the excess fiberfil and made the quilt sandwich. I free motion stitched around the pear to bring out the puffiness. The trim was added to the bottom.

Tips:  Although many paints nowadays are non-toxic, if your hands are going to be dabbling in a lot of paint, as a precaution it may be best to wear gloves. Regarding, trapunto, it is best done using polyester batting. It creates more dimension than cotton batting.

techniques and elements project

Art Quilts 11-13

These next three quilts have some fun embellishments.

I love the resin trapped pressed flowers on “preserved beauties.” Sequins are not something that I intend to use often but they give “wandering ginkgo” it’s brightness. The shisha mirrors add some dimensional whimsy to “goddess of thought.”

11) “preserved beauties”

“preserved beauties”
paper, printing/painting using found objects, resin

Tea bag paper
Cotton fabric
Felt batting
Gesso – white
Dynaflow – chartreuseteal
Polyester thread – copper
Golden Gel Medium (Gloss)
Ice Resin trapped pressed flowers
Flex Shaft Drill
Foam brush
Found objects – foam comb, gridded foam pad, wood dowel (from a broken foam paint brush)

I painted the tea bag paper and sealed it with the gel medium to create the quilt top. The found objects were lightly dipped in the gesso and I painted on some abstract designs. Using the drill, holes were made in the resin to allow for stitching. I added the felt batting and hand stitched the flowers onto the quilt top. Added the cotton backing and assembled the quilt sandwich.

Tips:  When working with Ice Resin, be sure not to stir it quickly. Too many bubbles will form. Also, take all safety precautions if using a Flex Shaft Drill. I use industrial grade leather gloves and protective eyewear.

12) “wandering gingko”

“wandering gingko”
resists, rubbings, sequins

Muslin
Cotton fabric
Felt batting
Gingko rubbing plate
Paintstiks
Watercolor paint – yellow
Paint brush
Canvas scrap
Polyester thread – copper
Floral stencil
Sequins
Beads
Blue painter’s tape
Glue gun

The rubbing plate was taped down and I taped the muslin down over the top of it. I lightly but firmly rubbed the paintstik over the muslin. The area around the gingko design was painted yellow in order to bring out the leaf shapes. The floral stencil was held down over the canvas scrap and I put hot glue in the empty spaces of the stencil to create a resist. The stencil was removed and watercolor paint was spread around the hardened glue. Free motion stitching was added to outline the floral shape on the scrap. I cut around the stitching to create the motif.  The quilt top was put on top of the batting and I hand stitched the motif, sequins and beads on. The backing was added.

Tip:  When working with a glue resist and stencil, try to work quickly. The glue dried with the stencil on top and I wasn’t able to achieve a detailed resist because I had to tug at the stencil to remove it. Some pieces of hardened glue pulled away from the canvas therby allowing some of the paint to seep into areas that would have otherwise been covered up.

13) goddess of thought”

“goddess of thought”
shisha mirrors, stamping, stenciling

Batik fabric
Cotton fabric
Collage stencil
Abstract stencil
Rubber stamps
Gesso – white
Staz-On Ink Pad – black
Foam make-up wedge
Shisha mirrors
Polyester thread – purple

I stamped and stenciled the quilt top in a frivolous yet balanced kind of way then added the batting and hand stitched the shisha mirrors on it. The backing was added and the quilt sandwich was assembled.

Tip:  Shisha mirrors scratch easily. Be careful to not let your fingernails scrape them.

techniques and elements project

Art Quilts 8-10

Continuing to adhere to the project list — three more abstract notions in the form of mini art quilts:

8) broken record

“broken record”
masking, mica, monoprinting

Muslin
Cotton fabric
Felt batting
Mica splitting
Sheet music scraps
CD
Lumiere – pearl turquiose
Golden Fluid Acrylic – ultramarine blue
Golden Gel Medium (Matte)
Cotton embroidery thread – turquoise
Cotton thread – variegated
Glass sheet
Blue Painter’s Tape
Paint brush
Clay shaping tool
Water in a spray bottle

I taped the CD (folded the tape unto itself and put it under the CD) to the top of a glass sheet to create a mask. I spread out the paint on the sheet and placed the muslin on top of it to creat a monoprint. After carefully removing the fabric, I then removed the CD, painted it and laid it on top of the circular white spaces that the mask left on the muslin; cut out and glued the music scraps to the painted CD spaces using the matte medium as glue. Some water accidently spilled on the quilt top and made a tiny discoloration on the dark blue background so I decided to spray on a little more water. Hence the batik look of the background. The quilt top was placed onto the felt batting. I made holes in the mica using a very sharp, pointy clay tool to allow for stitching. I hand stitched the mica onto the quilt top and then carefully machine stitched the quilt top and batting to the cotton fabric backing.

Tips:  Mica is fragile. Be sure and use a light hand when working with it. It’s a great material for protecting delicate papers.

9) blowsy scraps

“blowsy scraps”
natural dyeing, over-dyeing, painting

Muslin
Painted canvas scraps
Cotton black and white fabric
Felt batting
505 Spray and Fix (fabric adhesive)
Burdock Root
Coffee grounds
Acrylic paint – yellow, black
Plastic container
Toothbrush
Foam brush
Polyester thread – copper
White vinegar
Water

I prepped the muslin for dyeing with vinegar and water, boiled the burdock root in water and drained it to get a deep rich coloring. I dipped the muslin and simmered it for over an hour. Well, the results were less than stellar. It was much too pale. No more burdock for me. I should have used blueberries or red cabbage. To reach some type of acceptable hue, I put the fabric back in the pot, added some coffee grounds and let it sit on a very low simmer for an hour. After rinsing, a nice soft beige was achieved. The over-dye job was more successful. I put some diluted yellow paint in a plastic container and scrunched the black and white fabric down in it. I made sure to leave a little of the original fabric undipped to show the contrast. I flicked some black dots on top of the already painted canvas scraps using a toothbrush, to meet the “painting” requirement on the list. Placed the pieces of over-dyed fabric with it’s 505 sprayed, haphazardly arranged canvas scraps on the muslin background. Added some free motion stitching and assembled the quilt.

Tips:  Use perseverance when dyeing with natural materials. It can be difficult to get a rich, vibrant coloring. Also, be scrap happy. Save small scraps. They come in handy for a myriad of projects.

10) floating lotus

“floating lotus”
painting fusible web, paint mediums, paintstiks

Muslin
Cotton fabric
Felt batting
Golden Fabric Medium
Golden Fluid Acrylic – phthalo blue (green shade)
Painstiks
Stencils – lotus, abstract design
Stencil brush
Fusible web
Lumiere – pewter
Polyester thread – copper
Piece of cut foam sponge

The fluid acrylic was mixed with a small dollop fabric paint medium then spread on top of the muslin leaving some of the fabric’s original white color visible. After it dried I stenciled on the lotus and abstract shapes using paintstiks a stencil brush. I had previously painted a scrap of fusible web and cut out some abstract shapes. The shapes were ironed onto the quilt top, the top was added to the felt and backing.

Tips:  Don’t let unusual color combos scare you. I discovered that I love the uniqueness of blues and dark brown together. Regarding fusible web, if you decide to iron on painted fusible, don’t leave the iron sitting on it too long. I did that and it darkened the paint and took away the original glittery look of the paint.